Black Mirror

black mirrorHow had I never seen this show before? It combines dark psychological twists with intriguing exploration of the philosophical issues associated with the current (and near-future) state of cyber-tech and its potential impact on the human experience.  A week ago I had never heard of the show; I have now binge watched every episode on Netflix, and am desperate for more. Continue reading

Blood Meridian, Chapter I- “[I]n him broods already a taste for mindless violence”

Introduction
Back to the beginning…The year is 1847.  The Leonids refers to a prolific meteor shower, occurring in the month of November, the most famous in recent history having occurred in 1833.  This is the year the main character in the book, known only as “the kid,” was born.  He is 14 now.

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Blood Meridian, Epilogue- “[B]ones and the gatherers of bones and those who do not gather”

stone on fireThe epilogue is brief, just a single paragraph, but I think it merits its own analysis.  The first line provides: “In the dawn there is a man progressing over the plain by means of holes which he is making in the ground.” (p. 337).  The dawn?  Is this dawn of the next morning?  The dawn of time?  Who is this man? Continue reading

Blood Meridian Chapter XXIII, Part II- “This night thy soul may be required of thee.”

dancing bearIntroduction

So here it is, the second half of the last chapter in the book.  The kid, now 45, is in a riotous saloon in Griffin, Texas, known in the area for its whores and evil.  At the center of all of this, probably not surprising to any of our readers, is the judge.  “Watching him across the layered smoke in the yellow light was the judge.” (p. 325).  What will happen? Continue reading

Blood Meridian Chapter XXIII, Part I- “I knowed we’d bury him on this prairie.”

buffalo bonesIntroduction

Time continues to pass.  This chapter begins in the later winter of 1878.  Born in 1833, the “kid” is 45.  He’s in the north Texas plains.  It’s cold and windy.  He goes to set up camp for the night, and as soon as gets his fire going, he notices another fire across the way.  Like his, it warmed one man alone. Continue reading

Scandinavian Crime Fiction

the forgotten girlsI am just about finished with Sara Blaedel’s The Forgotten Girls.  As crime fiction goes, it is pretty standard fare.  What I didn’t realize until after I started reading it, however, is that Blaedel is from Denmark.  And looking back, the last several crime fiction books I’ve read have also been from that part of the world: Stieg Larsson and his Girl with the Dragon Tattoo Series (Sweden); Jo Nesbø and his Detective Harry Hole series (Norway); and maybe not exactly crime fiction, but along these same lines, Herman Koch (born in the Netherlands, but having spent some time in Finland)(I recently devoured both The Dinner and Summer House With Swimming Pool. Excellent!). Continue reading

Blood Meridian, Chapter XXII- “Our animosities were formed and waiting before ever we two met”

angry wolf 1More time passes in this chapter than in any other chapter in the book (save maybe the first, when we go from the kid’s birth to the present).  We learn some interesting things in this chapter.  For one, we learn the age of the kid.  Referred to only as “the kid” throughout the novel, we have no way of knowing how old he actually is.  Until now.  Though years and some historical events have been mentioned.  Recall the first page of the book: “Night of your birth.  Thirty-three.  The Leonids they were called.” (p. 3).  What does thirty-three mean?  1933?  1833?  Well, it’s the latter, as the “Leonids” reference would provide. Continue reading