Succeed, or Die Trying

Speaking of the need for every man to strive for excellence, president Theodore Roosevelt declared:

“[and] if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly, so that is place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat.”

This reminds me of another of my favorite quotes, by Alfred Lord Tennyson:

” ‘Tis better to have loved and lost, than never to have loved at all.”

What is holding us back?  Are we paralyzed by the fear of rejection?  The fear of failure?  We need to get off our butts and try.

  • You can’t win if you don’t play;
  • You can’t succeed if you don’t try;
  • You can’t love without facing the risk of being rejected or losing that love.

If it was easy, everyone would be doing it.  But I don’t want to hang out with “those cold and timid souls.”  Do you?  I’m going on to glory, or out with a bang, but I’m not going out like that!

Mysterious Cicero Dialogue

(In looking through some boxes in my basement, I came across the following, written out in longhand.  While its origins are not clear,  it is abundantly clear that I was both having fun and taking myself very seriously when I wrote this.  Also, it’s pretty freaking awesome.  Enjoy!) Continue reading

The Dangers of Euphemism

a-way-with-words-modern-scholar

A Way With Words, Part IV

I recently listened to a lecture series from The Modern Scholar company called A Way With Words: Writing, Rhetoric, and The Art of Persuasion. It was an enjoyable 7 disc jaunt, if not entirely riveting.

The most interesting part of the lectures for me was the brief section on Euphemism. The lecturer, Michael C. Drout, states that “euphemisms rot the brain.” Continue reading