Sometimes I’m So Smart I Almost Feel Like a Real Person- Book Review

Graham Parke has done it again.  With his finger firmly on the pulse of the technology-addled contemporary dating scene, Park’s Sometimes I’m So Smart I Almost Feel Like a Real Person is a hilariously parodic frolic into the world of the “I know everything, even though I’ve never done anything” world of the failure-to-launch millennial romantic.  Continue reading

“No Matter the Wreckage,” Poems by Sarah Kay- Book Review

sarah kay no matter the wreckageSome reviews, some books, some writers, I just feel inadequate to the task.  Sarah Kay has inspired me here, and I feel kind of speechless as a result.  As someone for whom poetry can sometimes feel like an almost spiritual experience, I don’t feel worthy or capable of doing the book justice.  Yet I feel compelled to say something. Continue reading

Before Midnight- Movie Notes

before midnight(The other two I’ve done in stream-of-consciousness/movie note form; I guess there’s no reason to deviate now).

We all lie to our children.  A lot.  At some point, remembering all those lies is going to become a challenge.  We are going to slip up.  And our then adult children will remember those lies as the only truth they know/knew.  That will undoubtedly prove awkward. Continue reading

How to Think More About S-E-X

how to think more about

I know what you’re thinking.  “More?  How could I possibly think more?”

But Alain de Botton’s How to Think More About Sex explores a qualitative more rather than a quantitative one.  A philosophical quandary rather than a sensual meandering.  In short, he explores ideas on how to think about it generally (he uses the catchy term “sex,” but it applies to all aspects of romance, relationships, and love), but does not share specific spicy episodes.

 

****DISCLAIMER- It hopefully goes without saying, but I don’t necessarily agree with the vast majority of his ideas.  But I found them interesting nevertheless.**** Continue reading

Before Sunrise- Movie Notes

[Have you ever dreamed about having a choice encounter with a true stranger and experiencing real romance, even if only briefly?  Well, as threatened/promised in my ramblings regarding the first movie, here are my equally random (but I think intriguing and kind of fun) thoughts/notes on the second movie, Before Sunrise (which is actually the first movie, but I saw the second first, and so should you).  These really were both very romantic and gorgeous and delightful films.  My notes will make more sense once you have watched, but might be fun anyway.  Here you go…] Continue reading

Before Sunset- Movie Notes

On one of those rare occasions where I found myself with both the afternoon and the television to myself, I came across Before Sunset (starring Ethan Hawke and Julie Delpy), just starting, and I sat down to watch.  I had never heard anything about the film, but the opening shots of the streets of Paris captivated my interest.  Continue reading

The Piano Teacher: Book Review

If you heard a book described as “like The English Patient,” would you read it?  Until recently, my answer would have been “____ no!”  But having just finished The Piano Teacher by Janice Y. K. Lee, and having since heard it described just so, my answer has maybe changed.  Maybe. Continue reading

The Marriage Plot by Jeffrey Eugenides

marriage-plot

The Marriage Plot by Jeffrey Eugenides

When I saw that my beloved Jeffrey Eugenides–author of The Virgin Suicides and the Pulitzer winner Middlesex–was writing a novel ostensibly about college, a love triangle, English majors, depression, and religious awakenings, I was prepared to be disappointed.

It just didn’t sound ambitious enough. Not that Eugenides should care in the slightest about anyone’s pre-reaction to his work.

Virgin and Middlesex were books that,  both in plot and in execution simply could not have written by anyone else. Of course they had themes that pop in in zillions of other books, but they were distinct.

I am happy to report that, for me, The Marriage Plot isn’t just Eugenides’ “college novel.” It’s more than an excuse for Eugenides to show that he has studied semiotics, Irigaray, Mother Teresa, Victorian and Regency literature, and the yeast HO gene. Continue reading

On Love: Book Review

I am in love with On Love by Alain de Botton.  This is de Botton’s first novel, and it may be my new favorite (I make no secret of the fact that I love everything that he writes.  Every time I read one of his books, in fact, it becomes my new favorite.  I don’t know if that is because I am serendipitously reading his books in order of increasing greatness, or I love all his books equally, and my love for the most recently completed book simply has the most pressing position in my consciousness). Continue reading